Rouen > le 106

Rouen > le 106

Hangar 106 was a former shipping warehouse and was selected in 2006 by Rouen Urban Community for rehabilitation as an arena for contemporary music (SMAC). Major restructuration was required to transform this vestige of the city’s maritime heritage into a suitable venue for musical performance. The new facility is at the forefront of regeneration of the city’s left bank district, serving to improve links with the right bank and providing transitions between the port and future neighbourhoods to the city’s south. The new SMAC is a strong, fully functioning symbol of Rouen’s regeneration. The choice of materials and colours, along with the decision to make the building double aspect, not only ensured the continuity of its aesthetic and historical ties with the past, but also voiced a clear signal that change was on the march. The two strips of glazing along each lateral façade open generously onto the surrounding environment, encouraging users to visually embrace the whole district. The foyer, now topped with a glazed roof allowing natural light to flood in, serves the same purpose. The use of stark metal, fashioned into softer curves at times, and the bold yellow of the neighbouring cranes whose towering silhouette is ever-present even from within the building, are expressions of an industrial idiom revisited with the utmost refinement. The façade is clad in Corten steel and bears the venue’s unmistakeably stylish wordmark, while the west-facing wall echoes back the zinc cladding of the roof with masterful precision. The interior spaces have been designed with the venue’s function uppermost in mind and are simple, practical and welcoming.
program
conversion of a warehouse into an arena for contemporary music - 1100 p. standing / club : 250 p.
project management
atelier d'architecture King Kong, Egis Centre Ouest, Ducks Scéno, IdB Acoustique
client: Rouen Métropole Normandie
location: Rouen (76)
surface area: 3 800 m²
Cost (VAT included): 11 900 000 €
date: completed in november 2010
images/photos: Arthur Péquin, Matthias Biberon
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